1book140: Twitter Chat With The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry's Editor

Susan Harris from Words Without Borders joins this month's conversation about poetry.

Willing to whisper Apollinaire's love words or to sing, as the Ngoni people from East Africa, that “the earth does not get fat”? Join us at 3 p.m. Eastern Time (EDT) on Monday, October 21 for a live Twitter chat with Susan Harris, editor of The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry.

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We have already read The Ecco Anthology back in April, during the 1book140's poetry month. Edited by Susan Harris and Ilya Kaminsky of Words Without Borders, The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry is back in the spotlight this month as we wish to revive the magic of internationally celebrated poets from the 20th century, rarelyif ever!translated into English.

The Ecco Anthology invites us to discover and know more of the world. We, at 1book140, invite you, through The Anthology, to discover “a country of words”:

We have a country of words. So speak, speak that I may lean
my path on a stone made of stone. We have a country of words.
Speak, speak that we may know an end to travel!

(Mahmoud Darwish, translation by Fady Joudah)

Live #1book140 Twitter Chat at 3 p.m. EDT (9 p.m. CEST) on Monday, October 21*
Susan Harris (@SusanHarrisWWB) will join us next Monday for an hour-long live conversation on Twitter. Participating is easy. Find a copy of The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry and follow us at @1book140. We'll tweet out when the live Q&A begins, and you can send your questions with the hashtag #1book140. Susan will answer with the hashtag so everyone can follow along. After the Q&A, we'll post the answers here at TheAtlantic.com.

If you're not on Twitter but still have a question, ask in the comments below and we'll include your question on Monday.


*The time of the Twitter chat was updated on Oct. 17 at 10:18 a.m.

Presented by

Rayna Stamboliyska is a research fellow at the Paris Descartes University, where she develops science-education projects for primary schools. She is also a writer the and co-runner of @1book140, The Atlantic's Twitter book club.

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