SNL's Melissa McCarthy Episode: 5 Best Scenes

Melissa McCarthy showcased her trademark physical comedy skills. Peter Dinklage and Dennis Rodman made cameos.

Second-time host Melissa McCarthy showcased her trademark physical comedy skills and an array of eccentric, loose-cannon characters, in a strong episode with mostly solid material. Dennis Rodman and Peter Dinklage made cameos. Musical guest Phoenix performed "Entertainment" and "Trying To Be Cool/Drakkar Noir."

Some highlights...

ESPN's Outside the Lines finds a coach even more menacing than Rutgers basketball coach Mike Rice: taser-wielding, toaster-throwing, golf-cart driving Division III women's basketball coach Sheila Kelly (Melissa McCarthy) of Middle Delaware State.

Voice coaches Adam Levine (Bill Hader), Shakira (Kate McKinnon), Usher (Jay Pharoah), and Blake Shelton (Jason Sudeikis) vie to attract hole-dwelling, professional trailer hitch-detacher Melissa McCarthy to their teams.

Drunk Uncle (Bobby Moynihan) is joined by brother-in-law "Peter Drunklage" (Game of Thrones' Peter Dinklage) as he drops by Weekend Update to discuss tax season.

Pizza lover Barb (Melissa McCarthy) tries for a loan to set up a pizza-eating business.

Charles Barkley (Kenan Thompson) drops by Weekend Update to discuss the NCAA tournament. ("I didn't even know Wichita was a state"...)

Also: Bathroom Businessman—a public service announcement for decency; Cecily Strong and Kate McKinnon offer '90s dating tips; Bar Mitzvah Boy Jacob (Vanessa Bayer) drops by Weekend Update to explain the story of Passover and poke fun at his parents, brother, and cat, David Ben-Purrion; and (not currently online) Ham Bake-off contestant Jean Carrera (Melissa McCarthy) turns to song, dance, and the music of Salt-N-Peppa to earn presentation points.

NEXT, on April 13: Vince Vaughn with musical guest Miguel.

Presented by

Sage Stossel is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and draws the cartoon feature "Sage, Ink." She is author/illustrator of the graphic novel Starling, and of the children's books  On the Loose in Boston and On the Loose in Washington, DC. More

On Election Day in 1996, TheAtlantic.com launched a weekly editorial cartoon feature drawn by Sage Stossel and named (aptly enough) "Sage, Ink." Since then, Stossel's whimsical work has been featured by the New York Times Week in Review, CNN Headline News, Cartoon Arts International/The New York Times Syndicate, The Boston Globe, Nieman Reports, Editorial Humor, The Provincetown Banner (for which she received a 2009 New England Press Association Award), and elsewhere. Her work has also been included in Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year, (2005, 2006, 2009, and 2010 editions) and Attack of the Political Cartoonists. Her children's book, On the Loose in Boston, was published in June 2009.

Sage Stossel grew up in a suburb of Boston and attended Harvard University, where she majored in English and American Literature and Languages and did a weekly cartoon strip about college life, called "Jody," for the Harvard Crimson. From 2004 to 2007, she served as Books Editor of the Radcliffe Quarterly

After college she took what was intended to be a temporary summer position securing electronic rights to articles from The Atlantic's archive for use online. Intrigued by The Atlantic's rich history and the creative possibilities in helping to launch a digital edition of the magazine on the Web, she soon joined The Atlantic full time. As the site's former executive editor, she was involved in everything from contributing reviews, author interviews, and illustrations, to hosting message boards and producing a digital edition of The Atlantic for the Web.

Stossel lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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