What Capote Looks Like to Capote: Famous Authors' Self-Portraits

From Sylvia Plath's measured, introspective strokes to Kurt Vonnegut's cartoon curls, these self-renderings reveal the ways some famous visionaries have seen themselves.

capote.jpeg
Truman Capote

Writing is a form of self-expression, but it's not the only one. So with favorite authors obviously having a lot to express about themselves, it's little surprise that they may dabble in mediums other than the written word.

Below, I've curated a small selection of wonderful visual self-portraits by famous authors—from scribbles to full-on oil paintings, from cheeky one-offs to serious painterly studies.

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

Presented by

Emily Temple is an editor at Flavorpill.

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