Track of the Day: '6am Jullandar Shere'

Past Tracks

In 1991, the Indian-British singer, songwriter, and guitarist Tjinder Singh, from Wolverhampton in the West Midlands, put together Cornershop with his brother, bassist Avtar Singh, drummer David Chambers, and guitarist-keyboardist Ben Ayres. The band was named (in full English-irony mode) for the stereotype of British Asians as corner-shop owners; the music, a fusion of Indian music, Britpop, and electronic dance music. (Very funny, if less wry: They released their debut EP, In the Days of Ford Cortina, on "curry-coloured vinyl.") I first heard them on Radio 1 in 1995 and became an instant fan. It was this track.

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J.J. Gould is the editor of TheAtlantic.com. More

Gould has written for The Washington Monthly, The American Prospect, The Moscow Times, The Chronicle Herald, and The European Journal of Political Theory. He was previously an editor at the Journal of Democracy and a lecturer in history and politics at Yale University. He has also worked with McKinsey & Company's New York-based Knowledge Group on global public- and social-sector development and on the economics of carbon-emissions reduction. Gould has a B.A. in history from McGill University in Montreal, an M.Sc. from the London School of Economics, and a Ph.D. in politics from Yale. He is from Nova Scotia.

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