1book140: Chat With 'The Fault in Our Stars' Author John Green on Twitter

Join us on Twitter this Wednesday for a live Q&A with John Green, author of this month's #1book140 read, The Fault in Our Stars.

1book140_icon.JPGJohn, a New York Times No. 1 bestselling novelist, recently asked President Obama to name his baby over Google Hangout. Obama didn't take the bait. John and his brother Hank also run the popular YouTube channels Crash Course and Vlogbrothers.

How to participate in the Twitter Q&A

For one hour, starting at 7 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Feb. 27, John (@realjohngreen) will respond to questions posted to our hashtag, #1book140. We will collect John's answers and publish them to TheAtlantic.com after the event.

If you can't able to join us on Wednesday night, add your questions in the comments below. We'll share them with John during the Q&A.

Watch John explain How and Why We Read in this Crash Course video:

Presented by

J. Nathan Matias develops technologies for civic participation, media analytics, and creative learning at the MIT Media Lab and Center for Civic Media. He also co-facilitates @1book140, The Atlantic's Twitter book club.

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