A Debut Novel by a 64-Year-Old Author? Great Literary Late Bloomers

Forget the fawning over the literary wunderkind—authors like Bukowski and Burroughs proved that maturity counts.

banner_chandler.jpg
Raymond Chandler

It seems like the literary world is forever in awe of the young writers, the wunderkinds, the 20 under 40, the five under 35, the 30 under 30. It makes sense, of course—there's something extra impressive about pulling off a great feat, literary or otherwise, when you're young.

But what about those authors who got started a little later in life? There's something pretty impressive about that too. I recently discovered Bloom, a cool website dedicated to the discussion of writers who published their first major work at age 40 or later. Inspired, I decided to poke about a bit on the topic myself. You might be surprised at some of the late bloomers on the list:

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

Presented by

Emily Temple is an editor at Flavorpill.

How a Psychedelic Masterpiece Is Made

A short documentary about Bruce Riley, an artist who paints abstract wonders with poured resin

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How a Psychedelic Masterpiece Is Made

A short documentary about Bruce Riley, an artist who paints abstract wonders with poured resin

Videos

Why Is Google Making Skin?

Hidden away on Google’s campus, doctors are changing the way people think about health.

Video

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis.

Video

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

More in Entertainment

Just In