Pink Army Tanks, Anarchist Ken Dolls: Contemporary Works of Political Art

These artists use their work to deliver a message about the need for social change.

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Guerrilla Girls

Some artists aren't moved by the beauty around them, their patrons' sponsorship, or some deep need for catharsis. Some artists operate on a different wavelength, channeling the injustices, imbalances, and harsh realities of their daily lives or the lives of those in need to create their art. That's not to say these artists are entirely motivated by altruism. They may get self-satisfaction from sticking it to the establishment, from pointing to the bad guys with a big giant neon sign, or from being badasses themselves. In the wake of the freshly concluded presidential debates, here are a few recent art projects made with a political message in mind. From the Yes Men to Ai Weiwei to the Guerrilla Girls—these artists employ more tools than one can pick up at the neighborhood art store.

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