Learning to Love the MLB's Crazy New Wildcard Games

Folks,

Fighting for yesteryear is never fun, especially in a hidebound sport like our National Pastoral. Um... Pastime. Resisting change in MLB can make anyone feel like a Grumpy Old Man, always complaining that life was better before the DH, back when no team made the postseason without winning a division, and all the smartphones were rotary dial.

MLB's postseason mission creep surely fits what's happening in the wider world of American sport. Big 10 basketball got their postseason tournament. NASCAR went to a postseason-like Chase format. College football tore up their bowl system, turning a charming if rickety old ritual into half-baked championship. As a nation we no longer seem to care as much about who proves themselves best over an entire season. We only care who gets hot at the end.

One could claim that this national fetish for play-ins, playoffs, sudden deaths, walk-offs, and wildcards is emblematic of a broader shift in the culture. Especially now that even baseball, our snowglobe from the 19th century, has been sucked into the Sudden Death cult, you could argue that the change in our sports represents a sad commentary on the state of the American Dream, speaking to our collective loss of belief in the idea that hard work and perseverance will be rewarded, and the replacement by a half-desperate gambler's faith in mere flukes, hot streaks, and lucky breaks.

You could argue that. But you would sound like a pompous toad.

It's a freaking game. MLB's postseason changes might offend me in some vaguely cranky way, but not enough to have kept me from watching a play-in game, or to keep me from watching every wildcard match-up with slavish devotion.

Life is change. Everyone and everything, even pro sports leagues, must adapt to survive. And MLB, finally, for once, seems to be getting it right. Let's celebrate that.

Jake, that play-in game for a trip to a playoff game which leads to the actual playoffs sounds like a lot of fun, doesn't it? Patrick, after making "television cash grab" sound like a bad thing, you make playing the World Series at a neutral, warm-weather site sound like the End Times. Why? Your words are duly marked. Still, spending two otherwise winter-ish weeks in, like, Miami would be more fun and make for a better brand of baseball than shuffling between Baltimore and Detroit.

Besides, what's the real danger of single game play-in? Too many upsets? Oh. America may not have actually been an underdog at anything since the War of 1812, but we love a dark-horse canine nevertheless.

–Hampton

Presented by

Sports Roundtable

Patrick Hruby, Jake Simpson, and Hampton Stevens 

Saving the Bees

Honeybees contribute more than $15 billion to the U.S. economy. A short documentary considers how desperate beekeepers are trying to keep their hives alive.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Entertainment

Just In