'Fitzgerald Deserves a Good Shaking': Scathing Reviews of Classic Novels

These 15 critics may have felt silly later on.

banner_gatsby.jpg
Charles Scribner's Sons

There are some literary classics that would seem to be near unimpeachable: works like Lolita, Ulysses, The Great Gatsby—the best of the best. Except that they're decidedly not unimpeachable—and they certainly weren't when they first hit bookshelves. These books and many others that are now considered masterpieces got their fair share of scathing reviews when they first came out, and in reputable publications (like one called The Atlantic).

Below, read 15 harshly negative early reviews of classic novels, and feel free to register your outrage (or your agreement) in the comments.

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

Presented by

Emily Temple is an editor at Flavorpill.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Photos of New York City, in Motion

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Entertainment

Just In