Ray Bradbury 1book140 Shortlist: Anything but 'Fahrenheit 451'

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After putting out a call for Ray Bradbury nominations for our August round of 1book140, one message became very clear: People want to avoid Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury's most famous (but perhaps most over-exposed) work.

"Anything but 451 please!" pleaded James Cullen. Cherie Weinstein agreed: "Haven't read a lot of Bradbury, except Fahrenheit 451, so I vote for anything BUT that."

So, here goes: Our 451-free Bradbury shortlist. Check out descriptions of the titles below, and then vote on which one you'd like to read next month. Polls close at 5 pm Eastern on Wednesday. (NOTE: If you have trouble with the voting module on this page, try clicking here.)

Happy reading!

Dandelion Wine
A short story-turned-novel about a 12-year-old boy who's widely thought to be patterned on Bradbury himself. Though Bradbury is known for his dystopian, science-fiction-tinged stories, Dandelion Wine is a sweet, lighthearted tale about the joys of childhood.

The October Country
A collection of short stories that explore some of Bradbury's most common themes: magic, the line between life and death, and what it means to be a citizen.

Green Shadows, White Whale
Another autobiographical novel, Green Shadows, White Whale is based on Bradbury's experience writing a screenplay adaptation of Moby-Dick with director John Huston. Longtime 1book140 participant Connie Donaghue points out that we could discuss the movie as well—it's available on Netflix.

The Martian Chronicles
This book—somewhere between a short-story collection and a novel—shows what happens when a group of humans colonize Mars after Earth is devastated. The humans must contend with the native Martians and face other challenges as they attempt to make a life on the new planet.

Something Wicked This Way Comes
Two teenage boys visit a travelling carnival and discover it's a lot weirder and darker than they'd anticipated. This novel is especially interested in the struggles associated with growing up—and with saying goodbye to lost youth.

Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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