Morning Coffee

After Bjork and, maybe, Radiohead, Led Zepplin was the next sector of "white music" I fell in love with. I have this image of myself circa 2002, as the inverse of some white dude bumbling around his black friends exclaiming his love for "this Rakim-guy." 


Oh well, sorry I missed out. And I'm mostly sorry because I would have loved to play "The Battle For Evermore" during one of my D&D sections with my brother Malik. Instead, we just played a ton of Public Enemy. Talk about dissonance. And yet it was my love for hip-hop that really took me to Zepplin. Hip-hop instills I love for drums, and so it was easy to love John Bonham driving the percussion on "When The Levees Break" like a great truck through a hail-storm. 

What a beautifully, relentless track. This is a double shot.


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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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