Newsweek, FP Magazine Clash over Editorial Philosophy

[optional image description]
Newsweek/Foreign Policy

Actually, the only clash here is over which part of the woman should be covered in black and which part should be exposed--and on this issue the two magazines are completely at odds. They are in broad agreement about how to get people to pay attention to your magazine.

I wonder how these covers affect how the cover stories--Newsweek's by Katie Roiphe and FP's by Mona Eltahawy--are being received. Eltahawy's is a particularly interesting case. Her piece is a passionate indictment of the way women are treated in Arab countries. And I would imagine that some of the people in those countries who most resist her message might try to use the cover to discredit it. (Though it's hard to tell in this thumbnail image, the woman is covered only by paint, and the lower part of her breast is visible.) Then again, there's an Arabic edition of FP, and it wouldn't shock me if its cover has a different look. 

Presented by

Robert Wright is the author of The Evolution of God and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Entertainment

Just In