10 of the Most Precocious Authors in Literary History

The literary wiz kids who put us all to shame when they were still in grade school

David Foster Wallace's recently discovered grade-school poem The DFW Literary Trust


The 150th anniversary of Edith Wharton's birth has brought all sorts of fun biographical information to our attention. For example, we recently learned about her favorite childhood game, "Making Up," a strange combination of chanting, pacing, and inventing stories. This vile behavior of course concerned Edith's blue-blood parents, but as we all know, it was only a precursor to the genius that was to come.

This got us thinking: what were other precocious authors doing as kids? (Hint: Stephen King was the coolest.) Look below to see what we found.

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

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