10 of the Most Precocious Authors in Literary History

The literary wiz kids who put us all to shame when they were still in grade school

David Foster Wallace's recently discovered grade-school poem The DFW Literary Trust


The 150th anniversary of Edith Wharton's birth has brought all sorts of fun biographical information to our attention. For example, we recently learned about her favorite childhood game, "Making Up," a strange combination of chanting, pacing, and inventing stories. This vile behavior of course concerned Edith's blue-blood parents, but as we all know, it was only a precursor to the genius that was to come.

This got us thinking: what were other precocious authors doing as kids? (Hint: Stephen King was the coolest.) Look below to see what we found.

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

Presented by

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we still save the night sky?

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we still save the night sky?

Video

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

Video

Desegregated, Yet Unequal

A short documentary about the legacy of Boston busing

Video

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

Video

Social Media: The Video Game

What if the validation of your peers could "level up" your life?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Entertainment

Just In