Cheeky Complaints Monks Scribbled in the Margins of Manuscripts

Evidently, spending years laying out a single gold-leafed page isn't all it's cracked up to be.

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The history of bookmaking hasn't been without its challenges, but never was its craft as painstaking as during the era of illuminated manuscripts. Joining the ranks of history's most appalling and amusing complaints, like this Victorian list of "don'ts" for female cyclists or young Isaac Newton's self-professed sins, is an absolute treat for lovers of marginalia such as myself—a collection of complaints monks scribbled in the pages of illuminated manuscripts.


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"Writing is excessive drudgery. It crooks your back, it dims your sight, it twists your stomach and your sides."
"As the harbor is welcome to the sailor, so is the last line to the scribe.
"This is sad! O little book! A day will come in truth when someone over your page will say, 'The hand that wrote it is no more.'

This gem comes from the Spring 2012 issue of Lapham's Quarterly, entitled Means of Communication, which previously delighted us with the first usages of famous words and to which you can and should subscribe immediately.

Thanks, Michelle.

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This post appears courtesy of Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

Presented by

Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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