The Unexpected Inspirations Behind Beloved Children's Books

The acid trips, war wounds, and survival stories that led to your treasured childhood fantasies

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If he were still alive, Alan Alexander Milne—you may know him as A. A. Milne—would have turned 130 years old yesterday. If you're a fan of Milne's books, you probably know that you can go and see the original teddy bear that inspired the character of Winnie-the-Pooh if you visit the New York Public Library—it's on display there along with a selection of other similar stuffed toys that inspired Tigger, Eeyore, and Piglet.

The fact that the books were based on Milne's son's toys is just one of a number of fascinating stories behind beloved children's classics, and we've related a few more such tales below.

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

Image credit: Harper and Row

Presented by

Tom Hawking is an editor at Flavorpill.

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