Why David Fincher Was the Perfect Director for 'Dragon Tattoo'

The hallmarks of Fight Club, The Social Network, and other Fincher successes are in his fantastic new adaptation of Stieg Larsson's novel

dragon tattoo mara and daniel craig 615 levin sony.jpg

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At first glance, it’s hard to view the English-language adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo as much more than a flagrant attempt to cash in on the Millennium trilogy phenomenon. After all, the first of Stieg Larsson’s best-selling novels was published in 2005 and the popular Swedish movie versions of each Girl book opened in the U.S. during 2010. We've seen plenty of offbeat investigator Lisbeth Salander and embattled journalist Mikael Blomkvist lately. What’s left to say?

That the new version of Larsson’s mystery works so well in spite of the familiarity can be attributed in part to its top-of-the-line cast, headlined by Rooney Mara as Salander and Daniel Craig as Blomkvist. But it’s mostly a testament to the strong influence of director David Fincher, who’s as far removed from a commercial hack as any filmmaker working in Hollywood.

There’s a good reason Fincher jumped straight from The Social Network to Dragon Tattoo, and it’s got nothing to do with money. This material is right in the filmmaker’s classic wheelhouse and he puts his distinct stamp on it in several key ways:

Stylish nightmare: Fincher is arguably the modern American master of the stylized, subversive thriller. Movies like Seven and Fight Club have pushed the boundaries of hard-R ratings in stories set against nightmarish backdrops. Seven offers Fincher’s twisted take on film noir, injecting the familiar milieu of cops and criminals with inexplicably gruesome brutality. Fight Club turns the antiseptic, corporatized modern world into a conduit for grotesque primordial rage.

Fincher plays up the contrast between the light white colors of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo—well-lit modernist interiors and the snowy Swedish expanse—and the dark secrets eating away at the damaged characters investigating the murderous past of one of Sweden’s distinguished families, the Vangers. At the same time, the violence is depicted with a startling lack of inhibition. It’s unflinchingly brutal at the appropriate times and slyly twisted at others, especially when Enya’s music is brought into the mix.

Investigatory nuts and bolts: Seven and Zodiac are accomplished detective movies that offer hard-edged, realistic depictions of what it means to investigate a crime and become obsessed by it. While movies about police investigations often take less pleasure in the process than its cathartic end, Fincher revels in the day-to-day grind of breaking down and solving a mystery.

Dragon Tattoo is made in that same tradition. With its flurry of facts hurled at the viewer, fast-paced editing, and an overarching edgy, punk-rock sensibility, the film depicts two characters on a dark journey that matters far more than the ultimate destination. The filmmaker brings alive the experience of examining old photos, hacking into computer systems, and conducting interviews, imbuing it with the thrill of discovery.

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Robert Levin writes about film and other entertainment topics for amNewYork, Inside Jersey, Backstage, and elsewhere. He is a member of the New York Film Critics Online guild.

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