'New Yorker' Critic Banned From Scott Rudin Movies for an Early Review

Mega producer Scott Rudin is spitting mad at The New Yorker's film critic David Denby for his freshly published review of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo , two weeks before the film's release and ahead of the time-honored "embargo" studios ask critics to honor. The notion of an embargo, is basically a polite agreement that exchanges access to screenings for timely coverage (usually saved for the week of a film's release). The digital age has been hard on this mutually beneficial quid pro quo, as usually it's been the Web where early reviews have appeared. But in the emails between Denby and Rudin, republished by Indiewire , The New Yorker's decision to break the embargo was about as old-fashioned as they come: a holiday movie schedule crowded with prestige movies, and a holiday double issue publication schedule. Denby said that in order to give Dragon Tattoo, a film he liked, its proper due, he and his editors (presumably) decided to go ahead and run the review early. This explanation didn't sit well with Rudin.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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