'Gay in America': Photographs of Gay Men From All 50 States

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From Molly Landredth's tender vintage portraits of modern queer life to 19-year-old Iowan Zach Wahl's brave message for marriage equality to Dan Savage's paradigm-changing It Gets Better project, it's a time of heartening change for the mainstream's growing awareness of just how faceted and diverse LGBTQ culture is. It is precisely this faceted humanity that photographer Scott Pastfield, a gay man himself, sought to capture in Gay in America, traveling 54,000 miles across 50 states in three years to weave a powerful, profoundly human tapestry of 140 fathers, brothers, sons, and friends from all walks of life, religions, ethnicities, and backgrounds, who happen to be homosexual males. From lawyers to artists to teachers to farmers, his perceptive, deeply personal portraits paint a layered picture of contemporary gay (male) life, the first-ever large-scale photographic survey of gay men in America.

People always tell you to shoot what you love, and that objective led me to this project. I knew I wanted to photograph a subject that I cared deeply about, and to create a body of work that would make a positive difference in people's lives.... I decided that I would find and meet a gay man from every state, listen to their stories, and photograph them in the hope that I could turn that material into a book that would change people's opinions and educate -- the book that I wish had existed when I was a lad. I wanted to produce a profound collection of ordinary, proud, out gay men who would otherwise never find the spotlight. --Scott Pastfield

Alex, Seward, Alaska

Josh & Joseph, Eugene, Oregon

Mudhillin, Newark, Delaware

Michael & Allen, Delta Junction, Alaska

For Pastfield, the project was as much a public service as it was a personal journey. He writes in the preface:

A year before my father's death [from lung cancer], I started going to a regular group-therapy session for gay men in New York City. That is where I met my partner, Nick. When I was struggling through my father's illness, he was there for me, calling me in Florida, making sure I was OK. When I came back to New York, we both realized we had fallen in love over the past months and we couldn't ignore it anymore. The hard part was, Nick was with someone else, and he still wasn't out to his family. He had two major hurdles to jump before our relationship could begin, and he did so, with grace and with courage. This year we celebrate our 13th anniversary together.

Dallas Voice has a fantastic interview with Pastfield, in which he reflects on the role the Internet played in painting a truly dimensional portrait of gay culture.

The Internet played a big part in how I found people. It would have been much more difficult to find them [10 or 20 years ago]. The thing that surprised me the most is the regularness of all these guys. I think most outspoken gay men and all facets of the LGBT community are those people who defined themselves very much by being gay and they have that issue that they really want to share with the world. They're very outspoken. I think the type of men I was looking for aren't as outspoken as a lot of those advocates are. That difficulty in finding them was made so much easier by the Internet. Ten, maybe 20 years ago, I'm not quite sure how I would have found the same men because they're not going to gay community centers, most of them. They're not out at a lot of gay bars or clubs in urban areas. I think that that's one of the major differences doing it now. That I was really able to connect with a lot of gay men that are for the most part under the radar and what most see of the gay community.

Thoughtful and perspective-shifting, Gay in America reveals the dimensions of humanity well past sexuality, a powerful step toward a culture that no longer conflates sexual orientation with human identity and a worthy addition to the best photography books of 2011.

Images: Scott Pastfield.

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This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

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Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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