Christopher Hitchens at The Atlantic

In his eulogy for Christopher Hitchens here at TheAtlantic.com, literary editor Benjamin Schwarz notes: "Hitch believed that he wrote his finest literary pieces for this magazine -- a fact attested to by the number of his Atlantic pieces that he included in his anthologies." He was also a longtime, engaged friend of the magazine. After he was diagnosed with cancer last year, Hitchens sat down with Jeffrey Goldberg and Martin Amis, talking at length about mortality ("How am I? I'm dying. I mean, everybody is, but I've accelerated the process -- or the process has suddenly accelerated on me. So I'm looking for ways of trying to die more like you, say."); the endurance and adaptability of anti-Semitism, the broader human psychosis it's a part of, and the role of anti-Semitic sentiment in British history and literature; and what he would do to deal with Iran if he were prime minister of Israel.

Here's the video:



Previously at The Atlantic:
Today, Goldberg writes, "I don't think he would mind me saying that I thank God for the privilege of having known him." Ta-Nehisi Coates remembers him here; Nicholas Jackson, here; and James Warren, here. Rothenberg Gritz pays tribute to Hitchens's reverence for friendship and awe for his friends here.

David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media says of Hitchens: "In a profession not always gentle -- and in person -- Christopher was the kindest journalist I've met. He might disagree as to its origin, but goodness was struck through to his center. And, as to his mind, I can see our 1857 founders embracing an intellect as formidable and morally impassioned as their own. We were privileged to publish some share of his work." Our editor James Bennet remarks: "No writer was ever more alive on the page than Christopher Hitchens, and, though I'm certain he'll always read that way, and though he isn't quite done -- he has left behind reviews yet to be published -- it is shocking to contemplate an end to his arguing, if not his arguments. For The Atlantic, it has been a privilege to publish his literary criticism."

See Hitchens's full Atlantic archive here.
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J.J. Gould is the editor of TheAtlantic.com. More

He has written for The Washington MonthlyThe American ProspectThe Moscow Times, The Chronicle Herald, and The European Journal of Political Theory. Gould was previously an editor at the Journal of Democracy, co-published by the Johns Hopkins University Press and the National Endowment for Democracy, and a lecturer in history and politics at Yale University. He has also worked with McKinsey & Company's New York-based Knowledge Group on global public- and social-sector development and on the economics of carbon-emissions reduction. Gould has a B.A. in history from McGill University in Montreal, an M.Sc. from the London School of Economics, and a Ph.D. in politics from Yale. He is from Nova Scotia.

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