10 Films That Avoided the NC-17 Rating and Suffered for It

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Movies like Eyes Wide Shut and Natural Born Killers were edited to appease the MPAA

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Shame, a candid and powerful look at sexual addiction from director Steve McQueen (no, another Steve McQueen) is out in limited release today, as we reported last month, it's going out with the NC-17 rating—no children under 17 admitted, under any circumstances. The rating, many have surmised, is due to the film's copious male nudity, and that's how the American ratings system works: all the naked ladies you want, but the erect male member=automatic NC-17.

The rating was initiated by the MPAA back in 1990, and was intended to be an alternative to the porn-stained (if you'll pardon the pun) X rating; NC-17 movies, like Henry & June (the inaugural film to carry the rating), Bad Lieutenant, The Dreamers, and Lust, Caution would be for adults, by adults. But it quickly became the kiss of death for filmmakers and distributors. Just as with the X rating before it, newspapers and television outlets wouldn't carry ads for NC-17 films, while larger theatrical chains and home-video outlets refused to carry them.

Smaller films would take the mark or (as Kids and Happiness did) go out unrated, while the editing process for big releases became something of a con game: If a film was rated NC-17, the distributor would make the trims necessary for an R-rating, enjoy the publicity, and then restore the cut material for the inevitable "unrated" DVD release (frequently carried by the very chains that refused to stock NC-17 films). By the late 1990s, studios wouldn't even bother with the first step, cranking out unrated versions of raunchy comedies and adult thrillers as a standard step in their home video release plans.

While the politics of who gets an R and who doesn't are shady at best (check out the terrific documentary This Film is Not Yet Rated), we can't help but wonder about what would have happened if the NC-17 could have been what its creators wanted it to be. Fox Searchlight's decision to release Shame with the scarlet letters/numbers has prompted another round of "will the NC-17 finally become respectable?" questions (answer: dubious), but what if that question weren't necessary, because the NC-17 had never been stigmatized? Had that been the case, we might have seen these movies uncut:

This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

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Jason Bailey is the film editor at Flavorwire, and has also written for Slate, Salon, and the Village Voice.

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