'We Love You Beatles': Vintage Children's Illustration Circa 1971

The Beatles are an utmost favorite around here. We've previously explored how the Fab Four changed animation, an infographic visualization of their life and music, Bob Bonis's lost Beatles photographs, and Linda McCartney's tender portraits of the icons. Now comes We Love You, Beatles -- a stunning vintage illustrated children's book from 1971 by Margaret Sutton, best-known for her Judy Bolton mysteries. It tells the story of The Beatles, from their humble Liverpool beginnings to meeting the Queen to the British invasion of America, blending the bold visual language of mid-century graphic design with the vibrant colors of pop art.

The trees were rocking and the clouds were swaying and the flowers were swinging and the birds were dancing to the Beatles sound. 'Let's sing about love and people being happy.' The Beatles sing songs you can sing in the sunshine. Sing them! Sing the Beatles' songs!

More than a charming way to explain who The Beatles were to a kid, We Love You, Beatles is a wonderful and visually gripping piece of cultural ephemera from a turning point in the history of both popular music and popular art.

Images: Margaret Sutton. H/T Burgin Streetman's Vintage Kids' Books My Kid Loves.

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This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

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Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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