'The Art of the Hobbit': Illustrations From the J.R.R. Tolkien Papers

More

In October of 1936, J.R.R. Tolkien delivered to his publisher the manuscript of what would become one of the most celebrated fantasy books of all time. In September of the following year, The Hobbit made its debut, with 20 or so original drawings, two maps, and a cover painting by Tolkien himself. But it turns out the author created more than 100 illustrations, recently uncovered amidst Tolkien's papers, digitized by Oxford's Bodleian Library, and freshly released in Art of the Hobbit -- a magnificent volume celebrating the 75th anniversary of The Hobbit with 110 beautiful, many never-before-seen illustrations by Tolkien, ranging from pencil sketches to ink line drawings to watercolors. It's a fine addition to our favorite peeks inside the sketchbooks of great creators and digitization projects in the humanities, and a priceless piece of literary history.

In creating the artwork for The Hobbit, Tolkien borrowed from a short story he had written for his son Michael, titled "Roverandom."

Also included are conceptual sketches for the now-iconic dust jacket cover painting of the mountains Bilbo Baggins transverses in his adventures.

HarperCollins publisher David Brawn observes The Hobbit's unfair eclipse in The Lord of the Rings' shadow:

People have celebrated Tolkien as a writer for years -- you haven't been able to get away from him since all the books of the century polls. But The Lord of the Rings has always been the focus since it was published in 1954 -- it's a much more grown-up, significant book. It has overshadowed The Hobbit as a more old-fashioned, children's book, which has become known in the context of The Lord of the Rings. The anniversary allows us to move the spotlight back on to the book which started it all.

A rare piece of cross-disciplinary creativity from the mind of one of modern history's greatest creators, Art of the Hobbit is equal parts literary treasure and treat of art, exploring the notion of the author as designer -- a particularly timely concept in the age of self-publishing and disciplinary cross-pollination in the making of books.

Via The Guardian.

TEMPLATEBrainPickings04.jpg

This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

An Eerie Tour of Chernobyl's Wasteland

"Do not touch the water. There is nothing more irradiated than the water itself."


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Entertainment

Just In