Meat the Future: An Animated Case for Supporting In-Vitro Meat

To anyone who's read Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma or seen Robert Kenner's Food, Inc., the wretched state of the meat industry and its noxious impact on the environment is no news. Meat the Future proposes an intriguing alternative to the traditional meat industry that neither requires you to become a granola-crunching vegetarian nor holds the foolish expectation that meat companies will suddenly take responsibility. And while that alternative might not seem appetizing at first, this beautiful and compelling animated short might just make you see the issue with new eyes.

In theory, a single cell from one animal can be used to feed the entire global population, without stressing the environment.

The film ends with an emphasis on the need for publicly funded science, something we've made a case for before.

The project is the brainchild of Afshin Moeini, Christian Poppius, and Kim Brundin from Sweden's Beckmans College of Design.

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This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

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Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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