Lessons in Plagiarism From Przekrój, Poland's Oldest Weekly

More

Israeli illustrator Noma Bar reacts to a blatant rip-off of his brilliant portrait of Adolf Hitler found on the cover of a legendary magazine

nomabarcopycat.jpg

I adore the work of Israeli illustrator Noma Bar, whose clever and thought-provoking negative space illustrations and minimalist portraits of cultural icons you might recall. Last week, reader Michal Korsun alerted me to something that angers and saddens me in equal parts -- Przekrój, Poland's oldest weekly news magazine, plagiarized Bar's brilliant portrait of Hitler, on the cover no less.

I passed the image on to Bar's representation and quickly heard back from the artist himself, who confirmed that it was indeed a case of blatant plagiarism. Daniel Horowitz, the illustrator who created the image (and who has since removed it from his portfolio site), neither sought permission for a derivative graphic nor acknowledged the very clear "inspiration" for the cover. Besides the very cut-and-dry fact that it's illegal to steal, creatively or otherwise, what's most heartbreaking about this is that it takes a clever visual metaphor Bar spent time and thought on, adds no value or commentary, and instead just subtracts from the creative merit of the original work -- to sell a magazine, remember.

In Noma's own words:

"Take a sad song and make it better".... In this case, [Horowitz] didn't make it better. The balance, detail, and tension in the face -- all lost. I would be a bit more encouraged if I felt that I learned something new about Hitler's face -- unfortunately, I didn't. It's an obvious trace of photo and a random barcode.

While I'm a vocal proponent of remix culture, it's important to understand the line between remix and rip-off. The law still struggles with this distinction and, in many cases, draws the line in such a way that it discourages remix. But as far as I'm concerned -- and some of the thought-leaders in this space tend to agree -- it comes down to a rather simple litmus test: If a derivative work changes the original in a creatively meaningful way, or offers cultural commentary or critique on it, then it's a new original work of its own creative merit; if it merely parrots or mimics the original while adding no context or commentary, then it's a rip-off.

That a publication of Przekrój's stature and legacy is unable or unwilling to make that distinction is a disgrace to both journalism and creative culture.

UPDATE 9/5/2011 10:23 p.m.: Daniel Horowitz has gotten in touch with me to give his side of the story. Here's what he had to say, published here with his permission -- be your own judge:

Just got back to [Brooklyn] from my trip to Europe and I am quite interested to read the many remarks including your own on the subject of plagiarism and the resemblance of my illustration to that of Noma Bars. A much more interesting article would be how two artists arrived at the same conceptual solution independently, which is in fact what is the case, altogether much less sensational than 'Spitting in the Face of Creativity'.

With my reputation at stake and working for many of the same international clients as Bar does, why on earth would I care to jeopardize my position by plagiarizing anyone's work, especially in a such an open way. You also accused me that I had the illustration up on my site and then took it down. I make visual metaphors daily for a living, hundreds and thousands over the course of a career, and in this case I apparently wasn't the first to think of replacing Hitler's mustache with a barcode.

I was more surprised than anyone when Mr. Bar's illustration was brought to my attention, and the similarity is more a comment on the fact that we think and solve visual problems alike than anything more.

Image: Noma Bar/Przekrój.

TEMPLATEBrainPickings04.jpg

This post also appears on Brain Pickings.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Sad Desk Lunch: Is This How You Want to Die?

How to avoid working through lunch, and diseases related to social isolation.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Entertainment

Just In