Monochromatic Design: A Tour of Our Colorful World

A design book unites everything from graphic design to packaging to explore the individual hues that color our everyday lives

As a hopeless lover of both color and minimalism, I was instantly enamored with Colour Mania by Victionary—a magnificent collection of stellar unicolor works in nine colors and a rainbow tone, spanning graphic design, illustration, packaging, branding, interior design, and more. Each of the book's 10 color-based chapters, separated by peel-off color tabs, features a meticulously curated selection of eye candy in the respective hue—yellow, orange, red, pink, purple, blue, green, brown, achromatic / black-and-white, and rainbow.

"Color initially conveys no meanings when it stands alone, but it connotes feelings and values that vary from places, culture and time and are subject to personal feelings at the same time."

The lavish volume features over 300 pages of cross-disciplinary contributions from all over the world, offering an implicit ethnograhic tour by way of color.

Unforgivingly vibrant and visually delightful, Colour Mania (Colors May Vary) is an absolute treat of eloquent unitone minimalism and a beautiful exploration of color as a storytelling device.



This post also appears on Brain Pickings.
Images: Maria Popova

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Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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