Down With Spoiler Alerts: Readers Like Knowing How Stories End

People enjoy it when short-stories are spoiled. The finding, published by U.C. San Diego researchers, concluded that readers preferred a spoiler paragraph before diving into short fiction, as opposed to just enjoying it as is. We can't identify with this, but understand the finding. The academics theorized the preference as due these possibilities: 1) Readers understand the story more when its spoiled. 2) A spoiled story means readers can enjoy the quality of the writing.

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