7 Essential Books on Street Art

Photographic beauty and cultural analysis collide in these in-depth reads about Arabic graffiti, Japanese manhole covers, and the history of a ubiquitous art form

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Street art is a frequent fascination of mine. Today, we turn to seven stunning, intelligent books that examine street art from a variety of angles, from the artistic to the sociocultural to the political and beyond, to glean holistic understanding of this ubiquitous, important, but often misunderstood medium for public dialogue and civic self-expression.


1. TRESPASS

WoosterCollective is among the most authoritative blogs on street art. Last fall, its founders, Marc and Sara Schiller, poured years' worth of expertise and insight into Trespass: A History Of Uncommissioned Urban Art -- a gorgeous and thoughtful anthology that covers everything from Guatemalan guerrilla gardeners to icons like Banksy and Barry McGee that's as much an exhaustive compendium of compelling artwork as it is a modern manifesto for activism, democracy, and freedom of speech. And since the lavish 320-page volume comes from Taschen, easily the most visually ambitious publisher today, it's an absolute treat for the eye.

"What makes Tresspass different from other street art books is that it's not a street art book. It's a book that certainly includes street art and graffiti but goes beyond that to also address performance, protest, sculpture, and the whole goal of the book was to really look at the context of street art in a much larger historical perspective." - Marc Schiller

Originally reviewed, with video, here.


2. STREET SKETCHBOOK

One of street art's most characteristic features is that it's so fundamentally public and in-your-face. But what goes into the private creative process of a street artist? That's exactly what Tristan Manco examines in Street Sketchbook: Journeys, the follow-up to his 2007 Street Sketchbook: Inside the Journals of International Street and Graffiti Artists -- a rare peek inside the sketchbooks of 26 of the world's hottest new artists, and one of my five voyeuristic peeks inside the notebooks of cross-disciplinary creators.

Originally reviewed, with more images, here.


3. ARABIC GRAFFITI

It's no secret that the the majority of street art coverage in the media, from blogs to books to films, has a severe geographic bias, with a tendency to focus on Western lettering and imagery. Arabic Graffiti is a breath of fresh Eastern air in the global dialogue on street art. The ambitious anthology by Berlin street culture tastemaker Don Karl and Lebanese typographer Pascal Zoghbi explores the use of Arabic script in urban context, curating graffiti artists and typographers from the Middle East and around the world who incorporate Arabic calligraphy styles in their artwork -- a beautiful intersection of tradition and contemporary creativity.

Part cultural anthropology, part study in creative ingenuity, Arabic Graffiti is also a timely and needed cross-cultural bridge of visual communication in the context of today's global political climate. (For more on the subject, see the fantastic Cultural Connectives.)

Originally reviewed, with more images, here.


4. STREET WORLD

What makes street art so fascinating is that it isn't an isolated discipline -- rather, it's the confluence of a myriad cultural phenomena. It offers commentary on countless social issues, and borrows inspiration from a multitude of other creative domains. In Street World: Urban Art and Culture from Five Continents (which you might recall from this old piece on Beautiful Losers, the excellent documentary about contemporary street art culture), Roger Gastman, Caleb Neelon, and Anthony Smyrski examine street art culture from a holistic standpoint, as it relates to other forms of urban expression -- skateboarding, bike messengering, DJing, fashion, gang politics, music, design, photography -- and explore how the advent of the Internet has fostered a new global street culture in less than a generation. From New York's back-alleys to Brazil's mega-cities to South Africa's townships, the hefty tome is divided into more than 50 topics, each illustrated with dozens of photographs.

Presented by

Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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