Track of the Day: 'Doorstep'

Past TracksThe woman behind the funky, unclassifiable tUnE-yArDs habitually yodels, shrieks, and delivers lines in tossed-off, gossipy scoffs. But for "Doorstep," off this year's w h o k i l l, Merrill Garbus just coos. And it's lovely.

Which is weird, because she's embodying a woman scorned. "Policeman shot my baby crossing right over my doorstep," goes her mantra. We don't get much backstory: just that she loved her man very much, and that "his trouble came from looking out for all the rest." She's a "peaceful, loving woman," and yet can't resist cursing God for what's happened. But instead of fury, we get Garbus's airy trill and a bridge of girl-pop sha-na-na's. The looped drums patter hesitantly, the bass-line drifts upward like a question. It's the sound of dumbfounded reflection--the ceaseless but somehow comforting reenacting that follows loss.



On iTunes: tUnE-yArDs / "Doorstep"

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Spencer Kornhaber is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he edits the Entertainment channel. More

Before coming to The Atlantic, he worked as an editor for AOL's Patch.com and as a staff writer at Village Voice Media's OC Weekly. He has also written for Spin, The AV Club, RollingStone.com, Field & Stream, and The Orange County Register.

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