'Kafka on the Shore': 4 Theories on Who the Boy Named Crow Is

1book140_icon.JPG Kafka on the Shore is full of mysteries: Where are the narrator's mother and sister? What is behind the Rice Bowl Hill incident? But the question captivating 1book140 followers is, Who is the "the boy named Crow"? Murakami's novel opens with a conversation between the narrator and the mysterious Crow, but several chapters in, we're still not quite sure who (or what?) he is.

Here are some theories floated by our readers:

1.) He's the narrator's imaginary friend

@sneakerseminole #1b140_6 Kafka gets strength from Crow, viz. case with many kids' imaginary friends. Crow I think is just the darker Kafka.less than a minute ago via web Favorite Retweet Reply



2.) He's the narrator's alter ego

@Draug419 I wonder if Kafka=TBNC or if TBNC is more like Kafka's imaginary friend/alter ego, Fight Club-style. #1b140_5less than a minute ago via web Favorite Retweet Reply



3.) He is the narrator

TBNC wishes Kafka a happy birthday when he's not there on the bus. So TBNC HAS to be Kafka talking to himself right...? #1b140_1less than a minute ago via txt Favorite Retweet Reply



4.) He's a ghost

#1b140_4 and wild guess just for fun: Satoru Nakata is Crow. His ghost leaves his body and tries to get other boys to run away from home.less than a minute ago via TweetDeck Favorite Retweet Reply



Do you have a theory that's not listed here? Let us know in the comments (but don't spoil it if you've already finished the book!).

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Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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