Confused by 'Kafka on the Shore'? Ask Murakami Translator Philip Gabriel

1book140_icon.JPG Who is the Boy Named Crow? What is the entrance stone? How are Kafka and Nakata related? These are just some of the many questions we've asked in our 1book140 discussions of Kafka on the Shore. As we wrap up our conversations about Haruki Murakami's novel, we'll have an expert to help us figure out some of Murakami's most confusing puzzles: Philip Gabriel, who translated Kafka on the Shore from Japanese into English.

Gabriel—a professor of Japanese literature at the University of Arizona and a recipient of the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Prize for Translation of Japanese Literature—will respond to questions on Twitter on Friday at 1 p.m. Eastern.

You can tweet questions to Gabriel—whose Twitter handle is @PhilipGabriel1—using the hashtag #1b140_q. If you need a little help thinking of what to ask, he suggests the following topics: the problems and issues that surround the whole process of translating the novel; how this novel fits into Murakami's body of work; Murakami's portrayal of the young and the elderly; this whole "This-world/other world" dynamic he has going; why read Murakami?

Participate in the conversation on Twitter using #1b140_q, or follow along here:

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Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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