A History of Film Title Sequence Design in 2 Minutes

Elementary-school geometry meets the high style of designers such as Saul Bass in this brief but brilliant video by Jurjen Versteeg

The art of title sequences is no stranger around here. In his graduation project, an absolutely brilliant motion graphics gem, Dutch designer and animator Jurjen Versteeg examines the history of the title sequence through an imagined documentary about the designers who revolutionized this creative medium. With winks to everyone from Georges Melies to Saul Bass to Maurice Binder in ways that capture each creator's signature style, the film is a piece of minimalist genius.

A History Of The Title Sequence from jurjen versteeg on Vimeo.

For more on finer points of artful title sequences, you won't go wrong with the fairly recent Creative Motion Graphic Titling for Film, Video, and the Web: Dynamic Motion Graphic Title Design.



This post also appears on Brain Pickings.
Via Quipsologies; Images: Jurjen Versteeg

Presented by

Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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