Hemingway Said What? A Cultural Cheat Sheet for 'Midnight In Paris'

Twenty-one mini lessons in literature and art history from Woody Allen's new film

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Sony Picture Classics

Woody Allen's latest movie, Midnight in Paris, which opens in wide release Friday, is centered on Gil (Owen Wilson), a struggling writer, and his dream-like journey back to 1920s Paris. There, he meets Ernest Hemingway, Scott Fitzgerald, Pablo Picasso, and more, in scenes filled with cultural and literary allusions. Most are middle-brow, some are high-brow, a few are practically inscrutable. To help get you in on the jokes, here's a spoiler-heavy compendium of some of the movie's best references:


Presented by

Reeves Wiedeman & Eric Nusbaum

Reeves Wiedeman does story research for The New Yorker. Eric Nusbaum writes about baseball and culture at Pitchers & Poets. His work has appeared in Slate, Seattle Weekly, GQ.com, and the Best American Sports Writing.

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