, among others, is touting this as a "totally recognizable" version of "That Thing." Indeed. But I think that's about the best you can say. I've said this before, but the cult of Lauryn Hill Return is more interesting to me, than Lauryn Hill herself. It's been 13 years since Hill released a studio album. Since then, she's given no real hint of realizing her former greatness. And yet people hold on, hoping for a comeback. 

I've always thought that says more about us, then it does about Hill, about, perhaps, some unrealized potential in hip-hop. At her height, she was the anti-Kanye--someone who seemed bent on using their voluminous musical gifts to speak, as opposed to shame, one of the most vulnerable sections of our community--young black girls.

Kenyatta talks about being in high school and seeing The Fugees video and thinking, My God, I want to look like that. I think that must have really meant something, to be a dark girl, and see direct evidence that you too were indeed in God's image. I think a lot of other girls must have felt the same thing. And then others just like the music. No crime in that.

On a side-note, I wish more musicians would stop confusing "live" with "as fast as possible."



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