The Atlantic and the National Magazine Awards

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The Atlantic is a finalist for five 2010 National Magazine Awards, the best-in-industry honors awarded each May by the American Society of Magazine Editors. In addition to the four stories listed below, The Atlantic is a nominee for Magazine of the Year, an award given to the publication that excels both in print and in digital. The honors will be announced at a ceremony in New York on May 10.

(Last month, in a separate ceremony, TheAtlantic.com was one of five finalists for General Excellence/Digital. Slate won that award.)

The following stories are finalists this year:

FEATURE WRITING: The Wrong Man (May 2010)
By David Freed
As the anthrax investigation intensified, the FBI focused increasingly on one suspect: Steven Hatfill. But he was innocent—and here, for the first time, he speaks out.

PROFILE WRITING: Autism's First Child (October 2010)
By John Donvan and Caren Tucker
In 1943, 10-year-old Donald Triplett was diagnosed with a mysterious disorder unlike anything reported before. Now 77, he is showing the world what autism can look like in adulthood.

PUBLIC INTEREST:"God Help You. You're On Dialysis" (December 2010)
Robin Fields/Propublica
Shockingly error-prone and brutally expensive, our federally funded system of dialysis care is failing. A year-long investigation reveals why—and what may lie ahead for health-care reform.

FICTION: Bone Hinge (Fiction 2010)
By Katie Williams
A short story.

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