'Love During Wartime': The Israel-Palestine Conflict, Within a Marriage

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A conversation with Gabriella Bier, whose new documentary explores the relationship between an Israeli woman and her Palestinian husband

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Filmregion Stockholm Mälardalen

The documentary Love During Wartime, which made its North American premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival, chronicles a marriage of inconvenience: Israeli dancer Yasmin and Palestinian sculptor Osama love each other, but settling down together becomes another issue entirely. Forbidden by strict Israeli citizenship laws from living in Jasmin's native Jerusalem, and harassed out of Ramallah, where Osama's family resides, the couple eventually wind up abroad in Berlin. Jasmin holds out hope of securing a German passport (with the help of her mother, who was born in Nazi Germany), but their bureaucratic nightmare only deepens. At one point, while handing down the news of a delayed court hearing to Jasmin and her parents, an Israeli lawyer wryly invokes Kafka.

Director Gabriella Bier's observational documentary, which will be distributed stateside by 7th Art Releasing, is a heartbreaking and unusually intimate account of a relationship impeded by geopolitics. Love During Wartime refrains from staking out political positions. But by exploring the effect of Israeli-Palestinian hostilities on these two individuals and their families, it serves as an effective plea for tolerance. Below, Bier talks about making her film:


As a Swede, what's been your personal relationship or connection to the Israel-Palestine conflict?

It's been a part of my life since I was born, because I'm Jewish. So it's no different if you come from the States or if you come from Sweden. [But] in Sweden, you really are a minority. You can't compare it to Israel, but when I'm here [in the States] people know what Shabbat is and they know what kosher is. They have a feeling what it's about. But in Sweden, nobody knows anything. And it really makes you see that you're outside—you're a minority. Not an outsider, because you're really part of the society still, but nobody knows. So Israel and Palestine—it's always been discussed in my family . . . so it's very personal.

For you, were there political dimensions to your interest in the project, in addition to your personal ones?

When it comes to Jasmin and Osama, I really wanted to find a couple that wasn't ... involved in any political movement. I wanted to find ... ordinary people. Because I wanted to talk from a very personal level. But of course, they encountered different political obstacles—he can't move to Israel, and she can't stay in Palestine. ... But I thought it would be much, much more powerful for us to meet them on a personal level. Because also I think with film, and especially documentaries, you talk to your audience on an intellectual level. You describe a lot of things, and a lot of facts. And I feel that I want to be closer to a narrative way of telling a story, because I think with film as an art form you should talk on an emotional level, and not on an intellectual level so much.

How did you come into contact with your subjects, Osama and Jasmin?

I had filmed two other couples before meeting with Osama and Jasmin, and they didn't want to continue filming because they had been threatened. One couple had been threatened—I mean, actual threats—and the other couple, they were just afraid. And I had filmed them for some time. It was very difficult when they said that they couldn't participate anymore.

But then I had read an article about Osama and Jasmin in Ha'aretz. And the woman from one of the other couple had been in contact with Jasmin's father, so she had the phone number. And I called him and they just said yes from the start, when I called them and explained what I wanted to do.

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Benjamin Mercer has written on film for The Village Voice, The New York Sun, The L Magazine, and Reverse Shot. He is a copy editor at Bookforum. More

He has also copyedited for two New York dailies: The New York Sun and amNewYork.

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