Library of Congress Makes 10,000 Sound Recordings Available for Free Online

The Library of Congress launched the National Jukebox website today, making more than 10,000 recordings available for free to the public. The tracks were all made between 1910 and 1925, and they range from original Gershwin recordings to sound effect files of snoring and sneezing. According to a Library of Congress press release:

Works by Fletcher Henderson, Al Jolson, George M. Cohan, Eddie Cantor, Will Rogers, Alberta Hunter, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Leopold Stokowski, Arturo Toscanini, and opera stars Enrico Caruso, Nellie Melba and Geraldine Farrar are all covered, as are such original recordings as the Paul Whiteman Concert Orchestra's "Rhapsody in Blue" with George Gershwin on piano, and Nora Bayes' "Over There."

....

Not just limited to music, users also can access political speeches by Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, William Jennings Bryan and William Howard Taft, recitings of famous popular poems such as "Casey at the Bat" and "Wynken, Blynken and Nod," readings from the Bible and early sound-effects records such as a collection of snores and sneezes.

The easiest point of entry into this vast collection is through the Library's curated playlists, which include "Early Tin Pan Alley" and "Songs by Irving Berlin."

Read the full story at The Library of Congress.

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Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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