'LE GUN 1,2,3': Cult Design and Illustrations Finally Available

The LE GUN art collective's beautiful magazines have been hard to find—until now. A preview of a compilation of the first three volumes.

legun7EDIT.jpg
In 2004, a small group of graduates from London's Royal College of Art founded art collective LE GUN and quietly started publishing one of the most compelling art and design magazines to come by in decades. Dedicated to celebrating the work of illustrators from around the globe, LE GUN instantly charmed audiences and critics, but its small scale and indie roots made access to it limited and coveted. Now, my friends from Mark Batty Publisher have gathered the first three issues of the magazine in LE GUN 1,2,3—an impressive, handsome tome that captures LE GUN's rich spectrum of creativity and provocative, relentlessly original artwork.

In the book's introduction, RCA professor Andrzej Klimowski, who advised the founding team, tells the project's inspired story—a tale of imagination, transformation and creative entrepreneurship:

"Many middle-aged people turn to their medicine cabinets for vitamin pills or, more drastically, turn to the knife for cosmetic surgery or the botox injection in a desperate attempt to hold onto their youth. I need only brush shoulders with the artists of LE GUN to be imbued with the elixir of life, which is so vital that it makes my hair stand on end." Andrzej Klimowski

legun16.jpg
legun9.jpg
legun10.jpg
legun13.jpg
legun12.jpg
legun11.jpg
With 400 pages and weighing in at over six pounds, the tome is, without any exaggeration, enormous.

legun1.jpg
legun8.jpg
legun6.jpg
legun4.jpg
Esoteric and beautiful, LE GUN 1,2,3 is an absolute treat of imagination, artistry, and visual eloquence from cover to heavy cover.


This post also appears on Brain Pickings.
Images: Mark Batty Publisher

Presented by

Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis. The only problem? He has to prove it works.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis.

Video

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Entertainment

Just In