Track of the Day: 'Every Part of Me'

Past Tracks"I love you with all my heart / And all my soul and every part of me," sings Steve Earle on this cut, a ballad from the upcoming album I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive. It's a grandiose statement on paper, but Earle doesn't sing it like he's trying to prove anything; he just sounds like he's stating a fact. The music matches his lack of bombast. There's no snare drum marking time on this song, only cymbal clicks and deep, booming toms. A snare would have given the song more punch than it needs; as it is, the music sounds patient and somehow timeless.

The idea Earle's presenting here, the idea of an undivided self--"I love you with every part of me"--is a powerful one. Most of the time, at least in my experience, the mind is a fractured, chattering thing, pulling in multiple directions at once. But sometimes love does come along and snap a distracted self into unity. What I hear in Earle's voice here is the same thing I've felt in those moments, when everything seems to align: the sort of weary, stupefied gratitude that comes in response to grace.

Every Part Of Me by Steve Earle

On iTunes: Steve Earle / "Every Part of Me"

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Alex Eichler is a reporter at The Huffington Post and a former staff writer at The Atlantic Wire.

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