Barry Bonds Convicted of Obstruction of Justice

Home run king Barry Bond's perjury trial has finally come to an end: After a seven-year federal investigation, three weeks of testimony, and four days of deliberation by the jury, Bonds was found guilty of obstructing justice for allegedly lying about using steroids during his career as a Major League Baseball player. A mistrial was called on the remaining three counts Bonds was charged for.

The Los Angeles Times reports:

Bonds was charged with four federal felony counts for denying under oath in 2003 that he had knowingly used steroids or human growth hormones and for maintaining that his personal trainer, Greg Anderson, had never injected him.

The probe that ensnared Bonds began with an investigation of a Bay Area laboratory that was selling illegal performance enhancing drugs to professional athletes and expanded to include athletes who lied to investigators. Bonds, holder of baseball's hallowed record for most home runs, was the probe's highest profile quarry.

...

Each count against Bonds had a possible maximum sentence of 10 years, but federal sentencing guidelines recommend 15 to 21 months in prison for a conviction. Many legal analysts had expected Bonds to be sentenced to home confinement if convicted.

Read the full story at the Los Angeles Times.

Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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