A History of Death

The trailer below looks fascinating. The whole narrative of black people involved in "white" (scare quotes intentional) music is really interesting. I don't know how we chose what musics we embrace, when we embrace them and why. 


A bit more:

Death began playing at cabarets and garage parties on Detroit's predominantly African-American east side, but were met with reactions ranging from confusion to derision. "We were ridiculed because at the time everybody in our community was listening to the Philadelphia sound, Earth, Wind & Fire, the Isley Brothers," Bobby said. "People thought we were doing some weird stuff. We were pretty aggressive about playing rock 'n' roll because there were so many voices around us trying to get us to abandon it."

Good stuff.

Presented by

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

Video

Is Minneapolis the Best City in America?

No other place mixes affordability, opportunity, and wealth so well.

More in Entertainment

From This Author

Just In