Tsunami Scene Makes Clint Eastwood's 'Hereafter' 'Not Appropriate' for Japanese Audiences

Out of sensitivity for those affected by the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Warner Brothers is pulling Clint Eastwood's Hereafter from Japanese theaters, Deadline reports. The film was released just last month in the country, but a harrowing, jarringly realistic opening sequence featuring a tsunami destroying a resort town is considered "not appropriate" for continued screenings in the country.

The visual effects team scored an Oscar nod for their work in the film, largely rewarding the meticulous computer generated imagery used to create the terrifying tsunami sequence (you can read our breakdown of Hereafter's visual effects here).

Here is the scene in question:



Read the full story at Deadline.

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Kevin Fallon is a reporter for the Daily Beast. He's a former entertainment editor at TheWeek.com and former writer and producer for The Atlantic's entertainment channel.

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