SNL's Miley Cyrus Episode: 5 Best Scenes

>[A relaxed and confident Miley Cyrus sang or danced in nearly every sketch and unveiled a spot-on Justin Bieber impression. Charlie Sheen got his due, both in Weekend Update and as played by Bill Hader in the clever cold open. The Strokes performed "Under Cover of Darkness" and "Life Is Simple in the Moonlight."]

Some highlights...

Cold open—Charlie Sheen unveils his new show, Duh, Winning, with guests John Galliano, Lindsay Lohan, and a hilarious Muammar al-Qaddafi (Fred Armisen). Musical accompaniment by Christina Aguilera. Sponsors: Tiger Blood and Baby Urine.





"Wink. Cocky nod. Point..." Miley Cyrus plays a suave Justin Bieber on The Miley Cyrus Show...





Taboo and apl.de.ap, the other Black Eyed Peas, look for a little appreciation, with help from the extra Kardashian sister.





Miley Cyrus and Raven Symone (Kenan Thompson) offer acting tips, Disney Channel-style (Talk loud, spy in doorways, enter on a scooter...)





Andy Samberg and Miley Cyrus spoof teen romance film Beastly (featuring a nude, fried chicken-munching Andy Samberg...)





Also: Weekend Update—Seth Meyers runs down this week's winners and losers; the Devil (Jason Sudeikis) weighs in on the Westboro Baptist Church funeral protestors.

NEXT, ON MARCH 12: Zack Galifianakis, with musical guest Jessie J.

Presented by

Sage Stossel is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and draws the cartoon feature "Sage, Ink." She is author/illustrator of the graphic novel Starling, and of the children's books  On the Loose in Boston and On the Loose in Washington, DC. More

On Election Day in 1996, TheAtlantic.com launched a weekly editorial cartoon feature drawn by Sage Stossel and named (aptly enough) "Sage, Ink." Since then, Stossel's whimsical work has been featured by the New York Times Week in Review, CNN Headline News, Cartoon Arts International/The New York Times Syndicate, The Boston Globe, Nieman Reports, Editorial Humor, The Provincetown Banner (for which she received a 2009 New England Press Association Award), and elsewhere. Her work has also been included in Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year, (2005, 2006, 2009, and 2010 editions) and Attack of the Political Cartoonists. Her children's book, On the Loose in Boston, was published in June 2009.

Sage Stossel grew up in a suburb of Boston and attended Harvard University, where she majored in English and American Literature and Languages and did a weekly cartoon strip about college life, called "Jody," for the Harvard Crimson. From 2004 to 2007, she served as Books Editor of the Radcliffe Quarterly

After college she took what was intended to be a temporary summer position securing electronic rights to articles from The Atlantic's archive for use online. Intrigued by The Atlantic's rich history and the creative possibilities in helping to launch a digital edition of the magazine on the Web, she soon joined The Atlantic full time. As the site's former executive editor, she was involved in everything from contributing reviews, author interviews, and illustrations, to hosting message boards and producing a digital edition of The Atlantic for the Web.

Stossel lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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