10 Stories to Watch This Baseball Season: Derek Jeter, the Giants, and More

The Major League Baseball regular season kicks off Thursday afternoon when the Braves visit the Nationals and the Tigers visit the Yankees, followed later in the day by four more matchups. These six games comprise the first of two appetizers, with 11 games set for Friday before the first full serving of baseball arrives Saturday with 15 games.

Between now and October, Major League Baseball will experience its share of milestones (think Jeter), upstart teams (think Orioles) and soap opera spectacles (think the ongoing ownership troubles plaguing the Mets and Dodgers). Mix in some season-long speculation about impending free agents (Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder being the most notable) and the growing pains from a dozen new managers, and we get no shortage of promising 2011 storylines.

Here are the top 10:

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Cameron Martin is a freelance writer and contributor to the New York Times, the Daily Beast, Yahoo! Sports, and Barnes & Noble Review.

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