What You Can Learn by Watching 'Glee'

So here we are watching Glee -- I know, I know, but what can I do, my kids love it -- and, though I usually fall asleep on the couch and lose the plot, I did surmise that the dim-bulb cheerleader was hoping Santa Claus would provide her paraplegic boyfriend with the ability to walk. This is where I I dozed off again, but when I woke up, one of the teachers had secretly provided the boyfriend -- Artie -- with a device called a "ReWalk," which was described to his astonished friends as a device invented in Israel that allows paraplegics to actually walk. The ReWalk is real -- here's a link to the manufacturer, Argo Medical Technologies, of Yokneam, a town near Haifa -- and it does seem like a fantastic device. It serves as a kind of electricall exoskeleton, allowing wheelchair-bound paraplegics to rise, and, as the manufacturer says, meet the world eye-to-eye.

The video, below, is fairly amazing. Israel, too, is fairly amazing. The lows are very low -- those of you who have been reading this blog the past couple of days know what I'm talking about -- but the highs are very, very high.
 
 

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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