Track of the Day: 'Left Too Late'

Past TracksOccasionally you run across someone with just too much luck and talent. This month's example: Florrie Arnold. For her day job, this 21-year-old holds down the drummer's stool in Xenomania's in-house band. If that name doesn't ring a bell, Xenomania is Brian Higgins' and Miranda Cooper's big-league pop production house based in leafy Kent, in the Southeast of England. They crank out hits for everyone from Kylie Minogue to the Pet Shop Boys, yet they also work with fringe pop stars, like Annie and Emeli Sandé.

Then, there is the fact that this young lady can sing. And write catchy tunes. So much so that Fred Falke, the uber-cool French house DJ has remixed several of her tracks.

And if that weren't enough, she's also striking enough to be the new face of Nina Ricci in the UK. But please don't hold all of these natural gifts against her.

"Left Too Late" is a perfect slice of sleek Euro-pop. The first few measures could easily be mistaken for a Yaz outtake. Then Florrie's cool vocals sweep in, the keyboards swoosh and swoon ramping up the energy, and by the time we get to the big-sing-along chorus, well, we're in fourth gear. This is no audition reel; it's a forceful statement. And because she's the girl from Xenomania (Forgive me, Astrud!) that is a good, good thing.



On iTunes: Florrie / "Left Too Late"

new track button.png

Presented by

Brendan Hasenstab is a writer and editor living in Brooklyn.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Entertainment

Just In