The Lovely Side of Elizabeth Edwards

Elizabeth Edwards died today at age 61, after living with breast cancer for six years. She'll be remembered for her husband John—his political career and well publicized affair—but in an Atlantic article last year, Caitlin Flanagan described what made Edwards herself remarkable:

Like millions of other women, I have always liked Elizabeth Edwards; in fact, I've had kind of a girl crush on her for years. She carries herself in such a graceful way, and she is one of those rare people whose good qualities are amplified rather than diminished by television. She's what you're supposed to be when you grow up: so comfortable with her intelligence and her position that she wears both lightly, appealingly. "Pretty is as pretty does," my father used to tell me endlessly, and sometimes when I'm watching her and thinking how pretty she is despite the years and the "chubbiness" she scolds herself for, I have to wonder if perhaps this is the truth of that old maxim: maybe she's just such a lovely person that she is transfigured by it.

Read the full article here.

Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Dravet Syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy that affects children. Could marijuana oils alleviate their seizures?

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Inside a family's fight to use marijuana oils to treat epilepsy

Video

A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

Video

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

More in Entertainment

Just In