SNL's Robert DeNiro Episode: 5 Best Scenes

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>[Not known for his laid-back volubility, Robert DeNiro mostly played himself, and seemed slightly nervous at times. But he warmed up over the course of the show and happily spoofed his tough-guy persona.]

Some highlights...

Cold Open: Julian Assange tops himself with "Wikileaks: TMZ—World Leaders Behaving Badly," featuring a pantyless Hillary, Quaddafi and his "nurse," and more...



Diddy teams up with "Hip-Hop Hermit" the Blizzard Man (Andy Samberg): he's "like R Kelly, Erykah Badu, and Kate Hudson all rolled into one." (Plus, Robert DeNiro in drag):



Italian talk show host Vinny Vedecci (Bill Hader) welcomes Robert DeNiro, and elicits DeNiro's DeNiro impression:



The Kardashian sisters (Nasim Pedrad, Vanessa Bayer, and Abby Elliott) drop by Weekend Update to apologize for flaws in their credit card line:



The fourth understudy (Andy Samberg) from the new Spiderman musical drops by Weekend Update to discuss the show's technical problems (and hits up Seth for an upside down Spiderman kiss):



Also: 13-year-old movie fanatic Keith (Bobby Moynihan) is not impressed by Robert DeNiro; Dan Brown-esque bestselling author Harlan Kane (Robert DeNiro) hawks his latest books (The Pokemon Directive, The Pinochet Sudoku...); this week's Digital Short, "Party at Mr. Bernard's."

NEXT WEEK: Paul Rudd, with musical Paul McCartney.

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Sage Stossel is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and draws the cartoon feature "Sage, Ink." She is author/illustrator of the graphic novel Starling, and of the children's books  On the Loose in Boston and On the Loose in Washington, DC. More

On Election Day in 1996, TheAtlantic.com launched a weekly editorial cartoon feature drawn by Sage Stossel and named (aptly enough) "Sage, Ink." Since then, Stossel's whimsical work has been featured by the New York Times Week in Review, CNN Headline News, Cartoon Arts International/The New York Times Syndicate, The Boston Globe, Nieman Reports, Editorial Humor, The Provincetown Banner (for which she received a 2009 New England Press Association Award), and elsewhere. Her work has also been included in Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year, (2005, 2006, 2009, and 2010 editions) and Attack of the Political Cartoonists. Her children's book, On the Loose in Boston, was published in June 2009.

Sage Stossel grew up in a suburb of Boston and attended Harvard University, where she majored in English and American Literature and Languages and did a weekly cartoon strip about college life, called "Jody," for the Harvard Crimson. From 2004 to 2007, she served as Books Editor of the Radcliffe Quarterly

After college she took what was intended to be a temporary summer position securing electronic rights to articles from The Atlantic's archive for use online. Intrigued by The Atlantic's rich history and the creative possibilities in helping to launch a digital edition of the magazine on the Web, she soon joined The Atlantic full time. As the site's former executive editor, she was involved in everything from contributing reviews, author interviews, and illustrations, to hosting message boards and producing a digital edition of The Atlantic for the Web.

Stossel lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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