Track of the Day: 'Alice's Restaurant Massacree'

More

Past TracksWe have a lot of music-related traditions at my family Thanksgiving. We sing a hymn instead of saying grace before the meal, and after dinner is over, we gather around my cousin Jesse's guitar and belt out our favorite selections from the Rise Up songbook.

But my favorite comes before the food, before the guests even arrive: when "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" by Arlo Guthrie comes on the radio at noon. My mom, dad, brother, and I are usually gathered in the kitchen, preparing hors d'oeuvres, arranging centerpieces, checking on the turkey in the oven.

The 18-minute-long song takes place on Thanksgiving and manages to skewer local government bureaucracy, protest the Vietnam draft, and celebrate group sing-a-longs. The best part of the song, though, is its simple, catchy chorus that embodies the inclusive, bountiful spirit of the holiday: "You can get anything you want at Alice's restaurant."



On iTunes: Arlo Guthrie / "Alice's Restaurant Massacree"

new track button.png
Jump to comments
Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

A Technicolor Time-Lapse of Alaska's Northern Lights

The beauty of aurora borealis, as seen from America's last frontier


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Time-Lapse of Alaska's Northern Lights

The beauty of aurora borealis, as seen from America's last frontier

Video

What Do You Wish You Learned in College?

Ivy League academics reveal their undergrad regrets

Video

Famous Movies, Reimagined

From Apocalypse Now to The Lord of the Rings, this clever video puts a new spin on Hollywood's greatest hits.

Video

What Is a City?

Cities are like nothing else on Earth.

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Entertainment

Just In