Watch Live: The Washington Ideas Forum 2014

George W. Bush's 15 Most Memorable Pop Culture Moments

George W. Bush's memoir, Decision Points, comes out tomorrow. The first full account of the Bush administration from his own point of view, the book has already provided some unexpected insights: that the worst moment of his presidency was when Kanye West called him racist, and that he considered ditching Dick Cheney as his vice president for the 2004 election.

But can Decision Points compare to Bush's other appearances in pop culture? He's been impersonated on Saturday Night Live, re-imagined as a comic book hero on The Daily Show, fictionalized as a Wisconsin beef tycoon in American Wife, and more. Before reading Bush's take on his presidency, a look back at his 15 most memorable pop culture moments:

Will Ferrell on Saturday Night Live



Ferrell has played many roles, but he may be best known for his definitive impression of the former president on the late-night sketch show.

Funny or Die's Presidential Reunion



Ferrell revived his famous impression for an all-star viral video featuring former SNL cast members—plus Jim Carrey—playing former presidents giving advice to Barack Obama.

Frank Caliendo on Mad TV



SNL's rival sketch show also had a rival Bush impressionist. Caliendo and his bit became so popular that the Dish Network used him—in character as Bush—as its spokesperson.

Bush Impersonator Appears at White House Correspondents Dinner



The real President Bush proved a good sport when he appeared as the opening act for host Stephen Colbert, making fun of himself alongside presidential impersonator Steve Bridges at the annual reception.

Andy Dick Plays Bush's Speech Writer



In the intro to this viral video, Arianna Huffington says: "There's a genius behind the stupidity." Andy Dick plays that person, Harlan McCraney, a fake speechwriter who takes credit for all of Bush's famous public speaking gaffes.

That's My Bush! (Comedy Central Sitcom)



From the creators of South Park, this short-lived comedy series turned the daily operation of the Oval Office into a workplace sitcom starring a fictional George and Laura Bush.

Meet the Spartans (Kicked in the Nuts During Credits)



Not many people saw the genre-spoofing film, but those who stuck around to the end saw a brief cameo of a Bush impersonator getting beat up by an angry Spartan.

Bush as a Little Kid (Lil' Bush)



The Comedy Central animated series aired for two seasons, re-imagining Bush and his Cabinet as children—students at Beltway Elementary School.

"Black Bush" (Chappelle's Show)



In this skit on comedian Dave Chapelle's sketch comedy show, situations that the former President really encountered are recreated with Chappelle in Bush's shoes.

Bush as "The Decider," a Comic Book Hero (The Daily Show)



The conceit in this bit on Jon Stewart's show recreates Bush as superhero, who "decides without fear of repercussion, consequence, or correctness."

Bush as a Folk Singer (JibJab Spoof)



The website famous for e-cards ventured into viral territory with their flash video of then-presidential candidates Bush and John Kerry as animated caricatures singing the Woodie Guthrie classic, "This Land Is Your Land."

W. by Oliver Stone



In the vein of Nixon and The Queen, the 2008 film was not as much a anti-Bush political feature as it was a biographical portrait attempting to piece together the seminal events in Bush's life and administration.

American Wife: A Novel by Curtis Sittenfeld



The story of a mid-Western woman who eventually becomes First Lady of the United States is a not-so-thinly veiled account of Laura Bush's life, from growing up in Wisconsin, to meeting an Ivy-League boozer, to finding her ideals at odds as she stands beside her husband in the Oval Office.

You're Welcome America (Ferrell's Broadway Show/HBO Special)



Ferrell's one-man show, fully titled You're Welcome America: A Final Night With George Bush began as a one-man send-up of the former president staged soon after he left the White House. It was so successful that HBO filmed it for a television special.

Fahrenheit 9/11 by Michael Moore



The documentary takes a critical look at how the goverment—particular Bush—responded to the September 11th tragedy. Released just before the 2004 elections, the film made nearly $120 million, making it the highest-grossing documentary of all time.

Presented by

Eleanor Barkhorn and Kevin Fallon

Eleanor Barkhorn is editor of The Atlantic's Entertainment channel. Kevin Fallon writes for and produces the channel.

Things Not to Say to a Pregnant Woman

You don't have to tell her how big she is. You don't need to touch her belly.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Things Not to Say to a Pregnant Woman

You don't have to tell her how big she is. You don't need to touch her belly.

Video

Maine's Underground Street Art

"Graffiti is the farthest thing from anarchy."

Video

The Joy of Running in a Beautiful Place

A love letter to California's Marin Headlands

Video

'I Didn't Even Know What I Was Going Through'

A 17-year-old describes his struggles with depression.

Video

Google Street View, Transformed Into a Tiny Planet

A 360-degree tour of our world, made entirely from Google's panoramas

Video

The Farmer Who Won't Quit

A filmmaker returns to his hometown to profile the patriarch of a family farm

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

More in Entertainment

Just In