Racist 'Looney Tunes' Cartoons Get DVD Release

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>The "Censored Eleven," an infamous collection of racist Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons, will be released on DVD in 2011, according to a ToonZone reporter at the New York Comic-Con. The animated shorts—with titles including "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs" and "Jungle Jitters"—were withheld from syndication in 1968 after their content was deemed too offensive for modern audiences:

All eleven films can currently be seen via bootleg videos and on YouTube, including the most well-known shorts featuring Bugs Bunny. Eight of them were also screened earlier this year in association with the TCM Classic Film Festival, partly as a test to see if they'd be worthy of a DVD release. Like other controversial racially offensive works, they have long been deemed historically significant. However, it's doubtful that, despite the collection being Warner's "most requested title," it will be heavily marketed, especially as a collection to be enjoyed by kids.


"Jungle Jitters," one of the Censored Eleven, is embedded below:



Grouping the Censored Eleven together with the films Birth of a Nation, Song of the South, and Triumph of the Will, Christopher Campbell at Cinematical asks, "Should films with antiquated, offensive treatment of race be seen? Or should they be banned, kept inside a vault forever or destroyed?"

Read the full story at Cinematical and ToonZone.

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Kevin Fallon is a reporter for the Daily Beast. He's a former entertainment editor at TheWeek.com and former writer and producer for The Atlantic's entertainment channel.

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